PRL KA AMRUT VYAKHYAAN

Date : 22-06-2022
Time : 16:00:00
Speaker : Shri Atul Karwal
Area : DEAN'S OFFICE
Venue : ONLINE

Abstract

This talk would revolve around various explorations of the world outside –the Everest Expedition and Cycle ride to Mt. Kailash and Mansarovar lake and sharing the learning from these explorations for self-awareness and self-evolution.

Date : 15-06-2022
Time : 16:00:00
Speaker : Prof. Guy Brasseur
Area : DEAN'S OFFICE
Venue : ONLINE

Abstract

The ancient Greeks, who based their view of the world on four elements (earth, water, fire, and air), considered air to be a neutral, inseparable, and weightless element. With the revival of the scientific method at the Renaissance, after a long period of obscurantism, substantial progress was made. The atmospheric pressure was measured, the first laws of hydrodynamics were established following Newton’s approach; the fundamentals for science-based weather forecasts were gradually developed. At the same time, the first steps were made to identify the chemical nature of air. The theory of “phlogiston” dominated the discussions between “pneumatic chemists.” Brilliant minds including Black, Becher, Stahl, Scheele, Cavendish, Priestley, and finally Lavoisier made the first experimental investigations that explained combustion and respiration. The 18th century with the chemical revolution initiated by Lavoisier, and the 19th century, with the discovery of ozone by Schönbein, highlighted the chemical complexity attached to air. The concept of “greenhouse gases” was introduced to explain climate change during the 20th century. Research since the 1950s emphasized the presence of a multitude of minor constituents and the role of the atmosphere in sustaining life. Since 1970, the atmosphere has been viewed as a photochemical reactor. Today, air pollution has become a crucial problem with severe detrimental impacts on people’s health. Space observations, surface measurements, and modeling are tools that should help us to provide pure air to all citizens of the world.

Date : 08-06-2022
Time : 16:00:00
Speaker : Dr. (Mrs.) Vandana Prasad
Area : DEAN'S OFFICE
Venue : ONLINE

Abstract

Angiosperms are the most dominant plant community and represented in most ecosystems of the world. Tracing the evolution of angiosperms is arguably one of the most challenging and relevant issues in plant evolution. Angiosperms appeared during early Cretaceous, rapidly diversified and dominated the Earth’s terrestrial ecosystem by the Late Cretaceous. The Indian plate, after its separation from the Gondwana land, drifted towards the north but remained below the equatorial zone in the southern hemisphere during the Late Cretaceous. The Late Cretaceous infra- and intertrappean sedimentary successions from central India as well as the early Paleogene lignite successions from Kutch, Cambay and Rajasthan, western India, yielded a large number of tropical angiosperm fossils. Many of these fossils show similarity with the plants of the present-day tropical rain forests of Southern Western Ghats, India, Southeast Asia, evergreen vegetation of Africa, Madagascar, and South America. This provides clues regarding the role of plate tectonics and deep time climate change in the evolution, expansion, and dispersal of tropical angiosperms. An integrated study of morphological characters of the fossil pollen and the nearest living relatives (extant species) of the tropical angiosperms, along with molecular data of extant species are now being used under a phylogenetic framework to reconstruct the paleobiogeographic history of tropical angiosperms.

Date : 01-06-2022
Time : 16:00:00
Speaker : Prof. Dmitry Budker
Area : DEAN'S OFFICE
Venue : ONLINE

Abstract

We will discuss some of the modern and perhaps unexpected ways to solve major problems of modern physics. Some involve table-top science and some involve accelerators.